Steve Parker

Knowledge, Experience and Personal Service

Direct 519-871-6533

Office 519-649-6000

Email: steve@steveparkerhomes.com

If you’re paying a lot of money for a new washing machine, wouldn’t it be nice to know how long you should expect it to last? There is, of course, no exact formula for figuring that out. Every brand and unit is different. There are however, some broad estimates.

 

According to an article in Consumer Reports, a washer and dryer will hum along just fine for about 10 years, with a likelihood of needing a repair during the last two to three. Leading brands offer a parts and labour guarantee for at least a year. So, if something goes wrong during that period, be sure to contact the manufacturer right away.

 

The National Association of Home Builders released a report a few years ago on the longevity of kitchen appliances. They found that refrigerators can last up to 13 years under normal use. Dishwashers and ovens will start to show their age after nine years. The worst record is for trash compactors, with a life expectancy of only six years before repairs or replacement is required.

 

Microwave ovens last an average of nine years. However, the door seal should be checked often. Otherwise, the unit will quickly lose efficiency. (You’ll notice this when your food doesn’t heat up as quickly and evenly.)

 

All experts agree that the best way to keep home appliances functioning properly is to follow manufacturer’s instructions for use and maintenance. If you’ve lost your user’s manual, you can download a new one (which may contain important updates) from the manufacturer’s website.

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March 1, 2017

The London and St Thomas Association of REALTORS® (LSTAR) announced residential sales achieved its best February results ever, since LSTAR began tracking sales data in 1978. A total of 763 homes were sold in February, an increase of 17% over the same period last year.

"We experienced another strong month, with year-to-date sales also up by 19.5%" said Jim Smith, LSTAR 2017 President. "Again, we're observing this trend of low supply and high demand, with February having a 9.8% decrease in the number of available listings, compared to this time last year. For those considering of putting their home on the market, the current conditions are very encouraging."

In February, a total of 597 detached homes were sold, an increase of 15% over the previous year, while there were 166 condominium sales, up 24.8% from 2016. The average sales price was $307,831 up 7.9% from the previous month.

"Overall, we experienced a mild February in terms of weather, which also played in factor in helping the strong performance throughout the month,” Smith said. “And we continue to see robust activity in the condominium market, with a quarter more units sold."

St. Thomas also had a very healthy February, with a total of 69 homes sold, up 25.5% from the same time last year. The average home price in St. Thomas was $242,028, up 25.7% from the previous month.

House StyleUnits SoldAverage Price
2 storey 158 $436,333
Bungalow 70 $229,471
Ranch 53 $372,968
Townhouse 64 $206,166
High rise apt. condo 44 $193,576

The best-selling house style in February continues to be the two-storey, followed by the bungalow and ranch. The average price for a detached home in February was $327,754, up 4.4% from the previous month, while the average price for a condominium was $236,180, up 19.8% from the previous month. 

The following table is based on data taken from the Canadian Real Estate Association’s (CREA) National MLS® Report for January 2017 (the latest statistics available). It provides a snapshot of how average home prices in London and St. Thomas compare to other major Ontario and Canadian centres.

CityAverage Sale Price
Vancouver $851,384
Toronto $803,455
Fraser Valley $643,331
Victoria $611,362
Hamilton $522,978
Calgary $466,984
Kitchener-Waterloo $421,151
Ottawa $389,875
Edmonton $360,199
Niagara $346,059
Saskatoon $335,812
London St. Thomas $292,291
Canada $484,306

According to a research report1, one job is created for every three real estate transactions and approximately $53,000 in ancillary spending is generated every time a home changes hands in Ontario. "Real estate continues to be a huge driver to the local economy," Smith said. "With the February sales, that translates into creating potentially over 250 jobs and putting us in a position to potentially generate around $40 million back into the local economy."

Click here to see the original News Release.


1Economic Impacts of MLS® System Home Sales and Purchases in Canada and the Provinces, Altus Group Consulting, 2013

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The trademarks REALTOR®, REALTORS®, and the REALTOR® logo are controlled by The Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) and identify real estate professionals who are member’s of CREA. The trademarks MLS®, Multiple Listing Service® and the associated logos are owned by CREA and identify the quality of services provided by real estate professionals who are members of CREA. Used under license.